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Mount Sinai to begin largest study of personalized medicine in clinical care setting

June 10, 2017

The IPM research team will create a Biobank database that will have each of these individual's genetic-disease risk profiles for heart, kidney, and liver disease, as well as their likely response to different medications and potential side effects - data that will be entered into Mount Sinai's electronic medical record system for patients who consent to participate in this new study.

The study will include one group of physicians and patients that will be randomized to a genomic-risk assessment, and another that will be randomized to a traditional risk assessment, using risk factors like cholesterol and high blood pressure when determining a patient's risk for heart disease. The team will evaluate whether the genomic-risk assessment, based on the presence of certain SNP genotypes as well as traditional risk factors, will lead to improved management of risk factors for heart disease in each patient and help prevent the onset of heart disease, as compared to the using traditional risk factors alone.

"The study will give the physicians in the genomic-risk assessment group access to each individual patient's genomic risk scores and predictors for treatment response and adverse drug reactions, allowing them to specifically tailor the patient's treatment and disease management," said Dr. Bottinger. "In addition, it gives them a rationale to treat high cholesterol and high blood pressure more aggressively to prevent them from causing or contributing to cardiovascular disease."

Additionally, the research team will also enter 3,000 Biobank patients into a pool of 32,000 patients as part of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) that will be conducted by the eMERGE consortium. The consortium hopes to identify genetic variants associated with 40 additional disease characteristics and symptoms, ideally making these genetic m available to treating physicians and allowing them to personalize their patients' treatments.

Source: Mount Sinai School of Medicine