BloodPressureHeartMeds.Org

Gene fusion prostate cancers susceptible to secondary mutations

October 29, 2017

Prostate cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer found in American men and is the second leading cause of cancer death in men. According to the American Cancer Society, one in six men will get prostate cancer during his lifetime, and it will kill one in 36 men. The Society estimates that there will be about 217,730 new cases of prostate cancer and about 32,050 deaths in the United States this year.

Traditionally, screening for prostate cancer has been done by a blood test known as the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) test. However, it has not found to be as reliable as once thought. "PSA testing is inadequate. It detects men with cancer but also many men with benign conditions," according to Dr. Rubin. "As we have seen from two major studies on PSA screening, for every 100 men with a positive PSA screening, only 25 will have cancer."

Dr. Rubin's prior research has focused on a better understanding of prostate cancer and finding a test that will distinguish clinically significant prostate cancer from indolent disease that does not require additional treatment. Their research has led Dr. Rubin and his colleagues to co-develop the diagnostics for a new test for prostate cancer with the University of Michigan and two commercial partners, Gen-Probe and Ventana/Roche.

"The new test being developed will identify cells that are seen only in people with prostate cancer, allowing us to know with great certainty who has prostate cancer," according to Dr. Rubin. "This will result in fewer unnecessary biopsies, which have potential side effects, including infections, bloody semen, and rectal bleeding."

SOURCE Weill Cornell Medical College